Coronavirus & Pools FAQ

During these uncertain times, it’s important to understand what you can do to ensure the safety and well-being of your family. Below are our most frequently asked questions about pool use and the Coronavirus.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is my pool safe to swim in?

Your pool will be safe as long as it’s correctly balanced. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a statement, asserting that “there is no evidence that COVID-19 can be spread to humans through the use of pools and hot tubs. Proper operation, maintenance, and disinfection (e.g., with chlorine and bromine) of pools and hot tubs should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.”

Source: CDC

Do you offer contact-free pool cleaning service?

Absolutely. We are now offering contact-free cleaning service for your pool. Despite the current events, Poolwerx remains committed to creating healthy, safe and fun poolside memories for families and friends.

If you have to or choose to self-isolate, we can help maintain your pool and spa, ensuring the health of your family with a contact-free weekly or one-time service to ensure it stays healthy and clear.

Are your pool supply stores still open?

Absolutely. Our retail locations are currently open. We are actively monitoring the Coronavirus (COVID-19) and following official guidelines. Our stores around the country remain open as an essential business, and we will continue to act on official health advice. We all have a part to play, and Poolwerx has put in place measures to help reduce the spread of the virus. For more on this, see our blog post about the actions we’re taking to keep our clients safe.

Does chlorine kill viruses in pool water?

It’s more complex than that. Both chlorine and pH levels need to be balanced to ensure your pool is healthy so it can break down germs.

Chlorine kills germs in pools-but it takes time to work and needs to be balanced in conjunction with the pool’s pH. Therefore, it’s important to test your pool’s water and make sure chlorine levels are always at the levels recommended by the health department.

As pH goes up, the ability of free chlorine to kill germs decreases. As pH goes down, the ability of free chlorine to kill germs increases but at the expense of your pool equipment, which is more likely to corrode, requiring expensive repairs. You need to keep your pool’s pH within an optimal range that best balances killing germs, the lifespan of the pool equipment and swimmers’ comfort.

Source: CDC

Why is it important to test my pool water?

It’s important to test your pool water to determine if your pool has the correct chlorine and pH levels to kill bacteria and viruses within your pool. By testing your water, you can determine what your pool needs to keep it balanced and healthy.

What chemical levels does my pool need so viruses can't spread?

For most waterborne illnesses, the CDC recommends the free chlorine concentration for pools stay between one and three parts per million and the pH between 7.2 and 7.8. “That’s the range at which chlorine is most effective,” said Michele Hlavsa, chief of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Healthy Swimming Program. If the water pH gets too high, hypochlorous acid won’t form as readily, and a too-high or too-low pH can also cause eye and skin irritation.

It’s important to note that the levels you need will vary depending on the type of pool you have or chlorination chemical used. For example, spas usually need a higher free chlorine concentration.

Your local Poolwerx is still offering free water testing in-store, or we can come to you and offer tailored contact-free test and treat solutions to assist you and your pool through this time.

Source: CDC

Source: LiveScience

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