Poolwerx Blog

Whether you want to learn more about pool care – or you’re simply interested in the latest pool products – the Poolwerx blog has got you covered. Discover expert advice, buying guides, easy-to-follow “how to’s” and the latest Poolwerx news – all here in one handy place.

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How to Avoid E. coli in your Pool

  Pool playtime is great family fun, but there are some things to watch out for. Keep reading below to find out why a free water test is one of the most important steps you can take to keep your little ones–and pool–healthy and safe. 58% of public pools contain E. coli. In a 2013 study, The CDC collected samples of water from pool filters from public pools and tested the samples for genetic material (for example, DNA) of multiple microbes. The study found that 58%of the pool filter samples tested were positive for E. coli, bacteria normally found in human feces. Presence E. coli is an indicator of fecal contamination being present in the water. What introduces E. coli to pools? Infants and young children love to spend time playing in the pool. Infants and young children also tend to have accidents. Swim diapers are  not fool proof and fecal matter can leak out. But people may not know that there is another factor that contributes to a contaminated pool–when swimmers don’t shower before they get in. E. coli is a bacteria that everyone has inside their body and although people don’t like to think about it, people often will have small amounts of E. coli on their skin as well. People typically have about 0.14 grams of poop (about the same amount as a few grains of sand) on their bodies at any given time. Just how not washing your hands can spread germs that make someone sick, not washing your body before taking a swim can lead to shedding the bacteria into the water. The more unwashed swimmers in the pool, the more bacteria that can spread. You can get recreational water illnesses by swallowing, having contact with, or breathing in mists or aerosols from water contaminated with germs. You might think you don’t swallow pool water, but you probably do… at least a little bit. A 2006 study found that during a 45-minute swim, adults swallowed 37 milliliters or water on average or almost two tablespoons. Children swallowed twice that amount. Once swallowed, germs live in their new host’s gastrointestinal tract until they’re pooed out, beginning the cycle again. Can the E. coli in the pool actually make anyone sick? The most common symptoms caused by recreational water illnesses are diarrhea, skin rashes, ear pain, cough or congestion, and eye pain. Diarrhea is the most common recreational water illness and unfortunately people who are already sick with diarrhea can spread it to others when they get in recreational water. Children are among the most vulnerable. Children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people who have health problems or take medicines that lower their body’s ability to fight germs and sickness are the most at risk of developing recreational water illnesses.

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How to: How to get your pool ready for summer

With the warmer weather approaching, now is the time to give your pool a pre-summer makeover. You may find that if your pool has had limited use, it may need some TLC. Want to get your pool in top shape, but you’re not sure where to start? Check out our top tips below.

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What to know about your dog and your pool

  Your pool can be a great source of entertainment and exercise for your dogs while helping them keep cool. Keep reading below to find out why a free water test is one of the most important things you can do to keep your furry friend–and pool–healthy and safe. A single dog in a pool is equivalent to 3 or more people. People often underestimate the impact their furry family members have on their pool’s water balance. When your dog goes for a swim, he raises your pool water’s pH and uses up chlorine faster than a human. In addition, their fur will introduce more contaminants into the water than people typically bring in. Fur tends to trap all kinds of particles, including dirt, dander, bugs and other pests, and even poop. Because of this, animals have small particles of fecal matter stuck in their fur. This fecal matter contaminate the pool’s water, which can lead to the transmission of Recreational Water Illnesses such as E. coli, Giardia, Hepatitis A and Cryptosporidium. Fur can clog up filters and equipment. Just like how humans shed 100-200 hairs each day, dogs also shed their hair, especially in the summer time. Even hypoallergenic dogs experience some shedding, but if you have a dog with a long coat or double coat, you are probably already aware of just how much hair comes off them. When dogs swim in the pool, hair they have shed will get into the water. And as your pool filters your water, it will get into and potentially clog your filter and other pool equipment. If you don’t check your equipment regularly, it may impact your filter and pool pump’s ability to clear out contaminants.

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Coronavirus & Pools FAQ

During these uncertain times, it’s important to understand what you can do to ensure the safety and well-being of your family. Below are our most frequently asked questions about pool use and the Coronavirus.

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Upgrade to a Variable Speed Pump Poolwerx Pointers Upgrade to a Variable Speed Pump Did you know that pool pump regulations have changed? As of July 19, 2021, all swimming pool pumps are required to meet new energy efficiency standards set by the federal Department of Energy (DOE) These new regulations determine the Weighted Energy Factor (WEF) of a pool pump, which measures in gallons per watt per hour, similar to how you measure a car’s efficiency with MPG. A higher WEF means a more efficient pool pump. This replaces the current measurement standard, which is motor horsepower (HP), measuring RPM. In general, all variable-speed pumps will be compliant while most single- and two-speed pumps with a motor total horsepower rating ≥ 1.0 will be non-compliant. If your current pump does not meet the new standards, don’t worry, you are still able to keep your existing pump. But it is worth considering making an upgrade as a future investment. Keep reading below to find out more about why upgrading to a variable speed pump can save you money in the long run. If you’re looking to upgrade, the good news is… our selection of variable-speed pumps already meet these new efficiency standards. So, if you’re looking to purchase a new pump for your swimming pool now, you don’t have to wait. Your local Poolwerx associate will be able to assist you in finding the best pool pump for your specific pool. Find your nearest Poolwerx Read More
3 warning signs that you need to schedule a health check Poolwerx Pointers 3 warning signs that you need to schedule a health check If you’ve ever purchased a home with a pool, you may have had an inspection done before moving in. But did you know that your pool should also be inspected throughout its life to ensure everything is in working order? Getting a health check will help you know that your pool is remaining safe, healthy and in proper working order. Here at Poolwerx, we recommend scheduling regular pool health checks to make sure things are running smoothly. Many pool owners enjoy maintaining their pool themselves, and while it is a great way to stay on top of your pool care maintenance, it is also important to have a pool maintenance expert check your pool equipment regularly. A pool technician who has the proper training and accreditation will be able to thoroughly inspect your equipment using tools that you may not have, and ensure the safety and efficiency of your equipment. They may be able to pick up on smaller faults or damage before it becomes a bigger (and more expensive) issue. Think you might need a health check? Continue reading below to find out some warning signs that you need to schedule a health check today. Read More
Every Pool Owner Should Know this Tip Poolwerx Pointers Every Pool Owner Should Know this Tip From summer pool parties and weekend barbecues to a quick workout, swimming pools can improve your day-to-day happiness and increase your home value. However, there are a number of things a homeowner must do to keep their pool clean, safe, and well-maintained. That is why it pays to develop a strong basic understanding of pool maintenance. To help you stay on top of things, Redfin.com reached out to pool maintenance experts from Huntington Beach, CA to Victoria, BC asking them to share their best advice. Here is the top tip from Jonathan Guest at Poolwerx Redlands, on how to ensure your pool stays in good condition for years to come. Circulate that water. One commonly overlooked aspect of pool maintenance that has a huge impact on the clarity of pool water is circulation. Circulating the pool water is helpful for a plethora of reasons: it disperses the chemicals evenly throughout the pool, discourages algae growth on surfaces, and pushes water through the filter, removing small debris. We like to see increased run time on the primary circulation pump in the summer months, to the tune of up to about 1 hour of run-time per 10 degrees of air temperature (in Fahrenheit, at the hottest point in the day) for a single-speed pump, and potentially even longer for variable speed. Read more at Redfin.com Read More
Poolwerx Launches Summer Sweepstakes Poolwerx News Poolwerx Launches Summer Sweepstakes One lucky winner will win free pool service for one year courtesy of the nearest local Poolwerx Franchise Partner. Poolwerx, in coordination with their local franchise community, announced today that one lucky client within a Poolwerx service territory will receive free pool service for an entire year. Pool homeowners that reside near a Poolwerx retail location or are within a service area can register to win by submitting their email address and verifying their zip code. In addition to free pool service, participants are also eligible to win weekly prizes like pool party packs that contain essential chemicals like a non-chlorine oxidizer, shock, phosphate remover, and an enzyme clarifier. No purchase is necessary to enter. “Between the pandemic last year and the tightening supply chain industry-wide, we wanted to remind pool owners that we’re always here for all their pool needs in spite of these challenges,” said Ruben Avendano, the VP of Marketing at Poolwerx. “That’s why we are thrilled to offer this opportunity to a lucky client to have a completely worry-free summer and enjoy their pool all year long.” Poolwerx retail locations are also handing out scratch-offs to clients that bring their pool water samples for a free in-store digital water test. Every scratch-off presents another opportunity for pool owners to win more prizes toward their next Poolwerx visit. Shoppers can win up to $15 off their next purchase or a mystery gift. “Owning a pool should be fun and affordable. We pride ourselves on providing our clients great, knowledgeable service at the best value. These scratch-offs are a great way to give our shoppers a little something extra,” said Avendano. “In conjunction with our first sweepstakes, we’re looking forward to a fun-filled summer and we can’t wait to find out who the lucky grand-prize winner is.” The grand prize winner will be announced in July. For full terms and conditions or to enter visit https://www.poolwerx.com/summersweepstakes.   Read More
How to Avoid E. coli in your Pool Poolwerx Pointers How to Avoid E. coli in your Pool   Pool playtime is great family fun, but there are some things to watch out for. Keep reading below to find out why a free water test is one of the most important steps you can take to keep your little ones–and pool–healthy and safe. 58% of public pools contain E. coli. In a 2013 study, The CDC collected samples of water from pool filters from public pools and tested the samples for genetic material (for example, DNA) of multiple microbes. The study found that 58%of the pool filter samples tested were positive for E. coli, bacteria normally found in human feces. Presence E. coli is an indicator of fecal contamination being present in the water. What introduces E. coli to pools? Infants and young children love to spend time playing in the pool. Infants and young children also tend to have accidents. Swim diapers are  not fool proof and fecal matter can leak out. But people may not know that there is another factor that contributes to a contaminated pool–when swimmers don’t shower before they get in. E. coli is a bacteria that everyone has inside their body and although people don’t like to think about it, people often will have small amounts of E. coli on their skin as well. People typically have about 0.14 grams of poop (about the same amount as a few grains of sand) on their bodies at any given time. Just how not washing your hands can spread germs that make someone sick, not washing your body before taking a swim can lead to shedding the bacteria into the water. The more unwashed swimmers in the pool, the more bacteria that can spread. You can get recreational water illnesses by swallowing, having contact with, or breathing in mists or aerosols from water contaminated with germs. You might think you don’t swallow pool water, but you probably do… at least a little bit. A 2006 study found that during a 45-minute swim, adults swallowed 37 milliliters or water on average or almost two tablespoons. Children swallowed twice that amount. Once swallowed, germs live in their new host’s gastrointestinal tract until they’re pooed out, beginning the cycle again. Can the E. coli in the pool actually make anyone sick? The most common symptoms caused by recreational water illnesses are diarrhea, skin rashes, ear pain, cough or congestion, and eye pain. Diarrhea is the most common recreational water illness and unfortunately people who are already sick with diarrhea can spread it to others when they get in recreational water. Children are among the most vulnerable. Children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people who have health problems or take medicines that lower their body’s ability to fight germs and sickness are the most at risk of developing recreational water illnesses. Read More
What to know about your dog and your pool Poolwerx Pointers What to know about your dog and your pool   Your pool can be a great source of entertainment and exercise for your dogs while helping them keep cool. Keep reading below to find out why a free water test is one of the most important things you can do to keep your furry friend–and pool–healthy and safe. A single dog in a pool is equivalent to 3 or more people. People often underestimate the impact their furry family members have on their pool’s water balance. When your dog goes for a swim, he raises your pool water’s pH and uses up chlorine faster than a human. In addition, their fur will introduce more contaminants into the water than people typically bring in. Fur tends to trap all kinds of particles, including dirt, dander, bugs and other pests, and even poop. Because of this, animals have small particles of fecal matter stuck in their fur. This fecal matter contaminate the pool’s water, which can lead to the transmission of Recreational Water Illnesses such as E. coli, Giardia, Hepatitis A and Cryptosporidium. Fur can clog up filters and equipment. Just like how humans shed 100-200 hairs each day, dogs also shed their hair, especially in the summer time. Even hypoallergenic dogs experience some shedding, but if you have a dog with a long coat or double coat, you are probably already aware of just how much hair comes off them. When dogs swim in the pool, hair they have shed will get into the water. And as your pool filters your water, it will get into and potentially clog your filter and other pool equipment. If you don’t check your equipment regularly, it may impact your filter and pool pump’s ability to clear out contaminants. Read More
How to be a more eco-friendly pool owner Poolwerx Pointers How to be a more eco-friendly pool owner Own a pool but want to make less of an impact on the environment? We hear you. It’s natural to want to reduce the amount of chemicals you’re using not only in your day-to-day life, but in your pool as well. The only problem is, pools usually require chemicals to keep its water balanced, healthy and free of pathogens. So how do you get a more eco-friendly pool without also sharing it with algae, bacteria, viruses and other harmful intruders? Fortunately, there are options out there that will greatly reduce the amount of chlorine your pool needs. This means you can use less chemicals, which is great for the environment. Plus, your skin and hair–and even your wallet in the long run–will thank you too. Read below to find out four ways to have a more eco-friendly pool. 1. Convert to a Saltwater pool If you’ve ever heard the term “saltwater pool,” that pool would be using salt chlorination. Contrary to popular belief, saltwater pools do have chlorine in them. However, you wouldn’t have to buy chemical chlorine like you usually do in a “regular” pool, because while saltwater pools do use chlorine, they create it on their own. Instead of adding in store-bought chlorine, saltwater pools naturally create their own chlorine through a process called electrolysis. When you add pool grade salt to a chlorine generator, the generator runs salty water through two electrically charged plates, which converts it to chlorine. The pool water is still sanitized using chlorine, but the process is different from that of a typical chlorine pool. Salt chlorination is a more natural and convenient method to delivering chlorine to your pool, compared to harsher liquid and solid chemical chlorine that’s used in traditional pools. It is also a lower-cost alternative to chemical chlorine sanitization in the long run. Salt water pools also use less chlorine, which leads to a gentler and more natural swimming experience. 2. Reduce Chlorine needs with Minerals Mineral pools use dispensers that deposit additional minerals such as silver and copper into your water, which work together to keep your pool clean and help battle algae, bacteria and other contaminants. Silver has antibacterial properties and has been used to clean water since the days of the Roman empire. Copper is a known algaecide, and is used in so many of the algaecides available for pools and hot tubs, and why some pool manufacturers add it to their pool mineral systems. Using mineral systems reduces your need for chlorine by about 50%, reducing your chlorine needs and stretching out your supplies further. You will still need chlorine (or bromine if your dispenser is compatible), but your needs will be significantly reduced. Plus, minerals have added benefits: minerals make your pool’s water softer. This makes the water feel more silky and luxurious, leads to less dry and irritated skin and hair, reduces wear on your equipment. 3. Go solar Solar pool covers can be a great way to keep your pool covered. Not only will it prevent any dirt and debris from falling in, but it can also help keep your water warm. Solar pool covers absorb heat from the sunlight and are able to heat your pool by up to eight degrees. Installation is very simple, and once the cover is measured and cut to the shape of your pool it is ready for use. Pool covers can help reduce your energy costs, minimize water loss, increase heat retention, and in some cases, even decrease chemical needs. That’s a win-win for lessening your pool’s impact! A solar-powered pool heater can also be a great way to warm up your pool, making it comfortable to swim in well past swimming season. Not only that, but it helps pool owners save money on heating costs, as well. Solar-powered pool heaters use energy from the sun to pump the warm water through the system, effectively using far less energy for water heating, as compared to an electric or gas-powered system. 4. The power of plants When you breathe, your body takes in oxygen and releases carbon dioxide, but when plants “breathe,” or undergo photosynthesis, they do the opposite, taking in and absorbing unwanted absorb carbon dioxide and releasing clean oxygen back into the air. Plants remove toxins from air –up to 87% of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) every 24 hours, according to NASA research. Plants are essential to all life on Earth. With the world cutting down so many trees, why not give back by planting some in your own backyard? Plus as an added benefit, the presence of plants has been shown to increase productivity, reduce stress and improve mood. Sounds like it’s time to build a backyard oasis with some gardening projects! Read More
How to open your pool in 7 steps Poolwerx Pointers How to open your pool in 7 steps Whether you properly closed your pool for the winter or let it go, eventually springtime returns with warmer days, and you have to get your pool swim-ready again. We put together two plans on how you can open your pool for the season: one plan with 7 steps, and one plan with one step. Read below to learn more! Step 1: Take the pool cover off your pool.   Clear off any dirt, leaves and debris on the pool cover so it will not fall in the pool, then remove your pool cover so you can access your pool. Step 2: Clean your filter if it wasn’t done in the fall.   The pool filter is a vital part of keeping your pool clean. Your filter removes small debris from the pool water to keep it clear. Because of this, your pool filter has to be cleaned regularly to make sure it doesn’t get too clogged up. Make sure not to handle your filter while the pool pump is on. Our recommendation is as follows: Clean your Media and Diatomaceous Earth (DE) filters every six months, or cartridge filters at least three times per year. Have your filter regularly inspected by a professional to make sure it is running in optimal shape. To put your mind at ease, we have the perfect hands-free program called Filter Care Plus, where we will come out to inspect and service your filter throughout the year! Find out more about this program here. Step 3: De-winterize and inspect your equipment.   Take the winter plugs out of the returns and skimmers. Clean and install the drains. Clean and inspect your pool pump, heater, automated pool cleaner, and any other equipment, and reconnect anything not connected. Put all the plugs back into the equipment that had been removed when you closed your pool. Also take the time to inspect, clean and reattach other pool features such as hand rails, diving boards, and ladders. We recommend conducting an equipment assessment and safety check before you start enjoying your pool for the season, to make sure everything is safe. Plus, you don’t want your equipment to break down or a leak to come up during the summer, so better safe than sorry! Our expert technicians will make sure everything is in working order. Give us a call to book a pool health check today. Step 4: Fill your pool to the normal level.   If your pool was drained when you closed your pool, it will need to be re-filled with water. If you have water in your pool but haven’t used it in a while, you will likely find that the water level has dropped. If the water level in your pool drops below the skimmer box, you run the risk of running your pump dry and burning out. To avoid this from happening, set yourself a regular reminder to check whether your pool needs a top up. Step 5: Turn on the breakers to the equipment. Before you turn the power on, make sure the valves are in the open position. Prime the pump by filling it with water, and make sure air is purged from the plumbing. Once the water is circulating through, inspect your pool for any cracks, leaks, or damaged hoses. If you see something that looks like a crack or other damage, turn it off again and call your local Poolwerx to set up a maintenance visit. Step 6: Test your water.   A free 60 second water test will let you know what’s in your water after your pool has been out of use. The results will help you know the exact chemical dosages you need to get your pool in optimal condition. Collect a sample from about an arm’s length under the water surface. To have an accurate analysis, aim to have the water tested within a few hours. Head to your local Poolwerx store to receive your 60 second computerized water test for free. Step 7: Balance your pool.   Now that you know what is needed for your pool, stop by Poolwerx for the supplies you need. Our helpful associates would be happy to assist you with any questions you may have and give recommendations. Want a no contact experience? With our curbside pick up, no need to leave your vehicle–we’ll bring your supplies right to you! We even have chemical delivery available where we can bring everything you need to your door. Read More
Poolwerx gains two entries on the exclusive AQUA 100 list Poolwerx News Poolwerx gains two entries on the exclusive AQUA 100 list Poolwerx Forest Lane, Poolwerx Union Hills and Poolwerx Beaches are among 10 US pool and spa retailers honored for industry excellence. Three Poolwerx locations have earned accolades from AQUA Magazine. Poolwerx Forest Lane in Dallas, TX, Poolwerx Union Hills in Phoenix, AZ, and Poolwerx Beaches in Jacksonville, FL are proud to announce they have been inducted into the AQUA 100, an exclusive honor bestowed to just 10 North American pool and spa retailers each year. The AQUA 100, presented by AQUA Magazine, is an industry-leading competition designed to honor excellence in pool and spa retail. In light of the adversity specialty retailers of all kinds have faced over the past decade — the rise of online shopping, the pressure of a recession and, this past year, the global pandemic — the AQUA 100 honors the diamonds of excellence that have not only survived, but thrived, proving once and for all the spirit of brick-and-mortar businesses will carry on. “To win an independently judged, national contest like the AQUA 100 is a real achievement,” says AQUA Magazine Executive Editor Scott Webb. “It is the highest honor in pool and spa retail.” “We couldn’t be prouder of our teams in Dallas, Phoenix, and Jacksonville,” said Chief Operating Officer at Poolwerx, Andrew Kidd. “As a franchise system, it’s our local partners that truly make the difference and exemplify all Poolwerx stands for; top quality pool service at a fair price from a friendly face.” The application process was rigorous, requiring entrants to provide detailed information on company history, customer service, store design, digital presence, marketing and community involvement, complete with supporting documents. Applicants were judged by an independent panel of retail experts. “As a small business owner, I pride myself on viewing customers as more than a transaction. They are my neighbors, friends, family and colleagues,” said Franchise Partner/Owner of Poolwerx Beaches, Nick McAbee. “I’m thrilled that my team and I are being recognized amongst these industry leaders for simply doing our best to serve our community.” Click here to read more at Aqua Magazine Read More
Own a pool? This tip could save you thousands. Poolwerx Pointers Own a pool? This tip could save you thousands. Did you know your pool pump could be costing you an extra $561 each year? The upfront cost of a swimming pool pump represents just 20% of the total cost of an average pump. Ongoing electricity costs making up the other 80%. These costs never go away! Your pool pump can be the largest user of electricity in your home, increasing your electric bill by up to $1,800 each year. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, switching to a variable-speed pool pump can reduce pool pump energy use by 50% to 75%. For a relatively small upfront investment, you can save an average of $561 of that added electricity cost every year. That adds up to thousands saved over your pool pump’s lifetime! Why pool pumps are important A pool pump is essential to the cleanliness of your pool, performing several water circulation duties. The pool pump’s primary goal is to circulate water through the filtration system. But it has other tasks, including powering spa jets, backwashing the filter, operating a chlorinator, providing water for the pool sweeper, circulating water through the heater, initiating flow to a solar panel and pumping water to waterfalls and other water features. These occasional tasks require extra energy on top of what they need for the circulation of pool water through the filtration system. Single-speed vs variable-speed pool pumps Most single-speed pool pumps consume an excessive amount of electricity. Why? Because they are typically oversized and overused when operating the pool. By design, single-speed pumps can’t change their flow rate so they are oversized to perform the most demanding task. These pumps traditionally have a 1- or 2-horsepower motor that will run at least five to six hours per day, if not around the clock, consuming energy. A variable-speed pool pump, on the other hand, is able to program and reduce the flow rate to match the required pumping task. A single-speed pump will operate at maximum flow rate even for tasks that require minimum flow rates. In contrast, the variable speed pump can be slowed down to the optimal level. This balances flow rate needs with energy use. This means it can perform tasks just as well as the single-speed, but with significantly less energy usage, saving you money! According to the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, approximately two-thirds of pool pump sales are estimated to be single speed pumps, with the main factor in the decision process for those buying a new pump being the upfront cost of the unit. Pool contractors often install single speed pumps because they aren’t aware of how more advanced equipment can save on energy costs in the long run. Sometimes, they don’t know how to install these less common but more efficient pool pumps. The best way to save Poolwerx has the pool pump options to save you money and knowledgeable technicians to install it for you. Not only that, but we are now offering interest free payment plans when you buy an energy efficient pump! What are you waiting for? Time to dive into year-round savings! Find out your savings with this calculator! Read More