How to open your pool in 7 steps

Whether you properly closed your pool for the winter or let it go, eventually springtime returns with warmer days, and you have to get your pool swim-ready again.

We put together two plans on how you can open your pool for the season: one plan with 7 steps, and one plan with one step. Read below to learn more!

Step 1: Take the pool cover off your pool.

solid pool cover

 

Clear off any dirt, leaves and debris on the pool cover so it will not fall in the pool, then remove your pool cover so you can access your pool.

Step 2: Clean your filter if it wasn’t done in the fall.

Man doing a pool cartridge Filter Clean

 

The pool filter is a vital part of keeping your pool clean. Your filter removes small debris from the pool water to keep it clear. Because of this, your pool filter has to be cleaned regularly to make sure it doesn’t get too clogged up. Make sure not to handle your filter while the pool pump is on.

Our recommendation is as follows:

  1. Clean your Media and Diatomaceous Earth (DE) filters every six months, or cartridge filters at least three times per year.
  2. Have your filter regularly inspected by a professional to make sure it is running in optimal shape.

To put your mind at ease, we have the perfect hands-free program called Filter Care Plus, where we will come out to inspect and service your filter throughout the year! Find out more about this program here.

Step 3: De-winterize and inspect your equipment.

Poolwerx pool technician looking at hotel pool equipment

 

Take the winter plugs out of the returns and skimmers. Clean and install the drains. Clean and inspect your pool pump, heater, automated pool cleaner, and any other equipment, and reconnect anything not connected. Put all the plugs back into the equipment that had been removed when you closed your pool. Also take the time to inspect, clean and reattach other pool features such as hand rails, diving boards, and ladders.

We recommend conducting an equipment assessment and safety check before you start enjoying your pool for the season, to make sure everything is safe. Plus, you don’t want your equipment to break down or a leak to come up during the summer, so better safe than sorry! Our expert technicians will make sure everything is in working order. Give us a call to book a pool health check today.

Step 4: Fill your pool to the normal level.

 

If your pool was drained when you closed your pool, it will need to be re-filled with water. If you have water in your pool but haven’t used it in a while, you will likely find that the water level has dropped. If the water level in your pool drops below the skimmer box, you run the risk of running your pump dry and burning out. To avoid this from happening, set yourself a regular reminder to check whether your pool needs a top up.

Step 5: Turn on the breakers to the equipment.

Before you turn the power on, make sure the valves are in the open position. Prime the pump by filling it with water, and make sure air is purged from the plumbing. Once the water is circulating through, inspect your pool for any cracks, leaks, or damaged hoses. If you see something that looks like a crack or other damage, turn it off again and call your local Poolwerx to set up a maintenance visit.

Step 6: Test your water.

Poolwerx pool technician poolside with water test bottle

 

A free 60 second water test will let you know what’s in your water after your pool has been out of use. The results will help you know the exact chemical dosages you need to get your pool in optimal condition. Collect a sample from about an arm’s length under the water surface. To have an accurate analysis, aim to have the water tested within a few hours. Head to your local Poolwerx store to receive your 60 second computerized water test for free.

Step 7: Balance your pool.

Poolwerx retail assistant and client buying chemicals

 

Now that you know what is needed for your pool, stop by Poolwerx for the supplies you need. Our helpful associates would be happy to assist you with any questions you may have and give recommendations. Want a no contact experience? With our curbside pick up, no need to leave your vehicle–we’ll bring your supplies right to you!

We even have chemical delivery available where we can bring everything you need to your door.

How to open your in one step.

What is a one step solution to open your pool? Pick up your phone and call Poolwerx, or put in an online service request and ask about our pool opening services! Our expert technicians are ready to help get your pool sparkling and swim-ready. You’re a poolside service appointment away from pool season!

Keep it up!
Now you’ve got your pool back to being clear and healthy. Congratulations!

Now that your pool is in great shape, don’t forget about maintenance! It’s easy to keep your pool healthy with a regular maintenance plan.

Testing your water every two weeks (weekly during high use periods) will help keep your pool water in balance. Whether you plan to use your pool once a day or once a month, regular pool service will help keep your pool healthy year-round.

Want a personalized service schedule that can suit your needs and your budget? Give your local Poolwerx team a call.

Now get out there and enjoy your pool.

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